Tag Archives: Emancipation

The Struggles After Foster Care

Life for many youth who emancipate from the foster care system becomes difficult to navigate. I know it was for me. It seemed like those who cared stopped caring once their caseload decreased. Fortunately, I had a supportive social worker who helps me in any way she can, but many youth do not. Although I am struggling, I can say that I have great support system.  Many youth go through the foster care system without anyone in their support circle, and so they exit without anyone too. Again, I have a support circle; but even with them, I struggle daily. Some people want to call me a “Success Story.” With everything that’s going on in life, I don’t feel very successful and I’m sure other youth feel the same way.

Housing

Where can I even start with housing? Finding affordable housing is like searching for Santa Claus, it doesn’t exist. Have you ever received those emails that claim that they have affordable housing for low income families and individuals, and you click the link to be sent to a page where a studio is over $2,000 and a 1 bedroom is $2,200? What’s even more frustrating is when a social worker gives you the same list. Housing is hard to find period, but if you are a young person just aging out, with no real income, and a credit report that was basically destroyed by those who were supposed to care for you while you were in the system, housing seems impossible. You end up in independent living programs for 18-22 months. You go from one independent living program to the next, trying to make sure you always have somewhere to sleep even if you hate it. If you can’t get in, you’re stuck Couch-surfing, which is dangerous, you end up in shelters, or on the streets. If you are on the streets, you most likely will end up doing things you never thought you would do such as stealing. The Mayor’s plan to end homelessness is working just fine, right?

Employment

One of the reasons it’s hard to find housing is because of the lack of employment. There are millions of jobs, but how many are willing to hire young people with no experience? Not many. However, it’s not that difficult to get the low paying jobs where you work, if you’re lucky, 4 days a week. For many, the pay is not enough to live on. For college youth in foster care or who have emancipated, you use to only needed 2 years of experience in something. That’s not the case anymore. Retail jobs are getting out of hand; some of them are looking for people with 5-8 years of experience just working the cash register. Seriously? I believe this tactic is used to discriminate on young people. This is a great example of ageism.

There are so many other issues that foster youth aging out may face, but we are expected to make it because we are adults. Why is it that foster youth are expected to “know better” or act as an independent adult when many youth at 21 who have never been in the system, and who have always had a strong support system are expected to live their life and have fun? For youth emancipating, their gift on their 21th birthday sometimes, unfortunately, includes the gift of adulthood on the dangerous streets of D.C.

 

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Reminder: Aging Out of the Foster Care System

Please help this single mother who is nearing emancipation:

“I have been in the foster care system for four and a half years now. I entered the system at fifteen and I will age out when I am twenty-one. My name is Olivia Alexander, I am currently nineteen so I have about a year and a half before I am out and completely on my own. I will have to provide for not only myself but my daughter as well. I am the main provider for us now but it is hard trying to provide what we need with the small stipend I get. It was a little easier when I was working but now that I am not it is difficult. I also attend college full time so trying to balance being a mother, a student, and trying to get a job can be a bit overwhelming. I am doing the best that I can to make sure  my daughter and I will be alright when I age out. I love my daughter more than anything in the whole galaxy! I just want to be the mother she desrves and provide her with a happy life. I don’t want to have to worry about where we will be laying our heads when I have to leave the system. That is why I started this campaign, to raise additional money that will go towards us moving. I know a year and a half seems far off but it comes sooner than thought sometimes and I want to be prepared for when it comes. My goal is to reach at least $3,000 but anything we get will be greatly appreciated!! A little help goes a long way, especially with my situation. Please give any help that you can even if it is only a dollar, it will be of so much help. I want to thank anyone in advance who will lend a helping hand..”

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Aging Out of the Foster Care System

Please help this single mother who is nearing emancipation:

“I have been in the foster care system for four and a half years now. I entered the system at fifteen and I will age out when I am twenty-one. My name is Olivia Alexander, I am currently nineteen so I have about a year and a half before I am out and completely on my own. I will have to provide for not only myself but my daughter as well. I am the main provider for us now but it is hard trying to provide what we need with the small stipend I get. It was a little easier when I was working but now that I am not it is difficult. I also attend college full time so trying to balance being a mother, a student, and trying to get a job can be a bit overwhelming. I am doing the best that I can to make sure  my daughter and I will be alright when I age out. I love my daughter more than anything in the whole galaxy! I just want to be the mother she desrves and provide her with a happy life. I don’t want to have to worry about where we will be laying our heads when I have to leave the system. That is why I started this campaign, to raise additional money that will go towards us moving. I know a year and a half seems far off but it comes sooner than thought sometimes and I want to be prepared for when it comes. My goal is to reach at least $3,000 but anything we get will be greatly appreciated!! A little help goes a long way, especially with my situation. Please give any help that you can even if it is only a dollar, it will be of so much help. I want to thank anyone in advance who will lend a helping hand..”

donate

Reminder: Domestic Violence Wears Many Tags Presents “Brokenness to Boldness”

Join QueenAfi as she interviews Ashley Strange a native of Washington, DC where she attended public schools. Ashley was forced at a young age to grow up due to the lack of emotional support from school. There were times she felt alone, she felt that no one wanted to help.

Ashley was placed in special education classes with students who had mental and behavioral problems. She learned very little in these classes and stopped going little by little. After the death of her mother she gave up on school completely and became a product of the DC foster care system.

Now, she is an upcoming college senior at Trinity Washington University. How did she do it?

To learn more about her journey from ‘Brokenness to Boldness,’ tune in to talkshoe.com or call 724-444-7444 and enter show ID #83271

DVWMT
DVWMT

 

 

Reminder: Domestic Violence Wears Many Tags Presents “Brokenness to Boldness”

Join QueenAfi as she interviews Ashley Strange a native of Washington, DC where she attended public schools. Ashley was forced at a young age to grow up due to the lack of emotional support from school. There were times she felt alone, she felt that no one wanted to help.

Ashley was placed in special education classes with students who had mental and behavioral problems. She learned very little in these classes and stopped going little by little. After the death of her mother she gave up on school completely and became a product of the DC foster care system.

Now, she is an upcoming college senior at Trinity Washington University. How did she do it?

To learn more about her journey from ‘Brokenness to Boldness,’ tune in to talkshoe.com or call 724-444-7444 and enter show ID #83271

DVWMT
DVWMT

 

 

Reminder: Domestic Violence Wears Many Tags Presents “Brokenness to Boldness”

Join QueenAfi as she interviews Ashley Strange a native of Washington, DC where she attended public schools. Ashley was forced at a young age to grow up due to the lack of emotional support from school. There were times she felt alone, she felt that no one wanted to help.

Ashley was placed in special education classes with students who had mental and behavioral problems. She learned very little in these classes and stopped going little by little. After the death of her mother she gave up on school completely and became a product of the DC foster care system.

Now, she is an upcoming college senior at Trinity Washington University. How did she do it?

To learn more about her journey from ‘Brokenness to Boldness,’ tune in to talkshoe.com or call 724-444-7444 and enter show ID #83271

DVWMT
DVWMT

 

 

Reminder: Domestic Violence Wears Many Tags Presents “Brokenness to Boldness”

Join QueenAfi as she interviews Ashley Strange a native of Washington, DC where she attended public schools. Ashley was forced at a young age to grow up due to the lack of emotional support from school. There were times she felt alone, she felt that no one wanted to help.

Ashley was placed in special education classes with students who had mental and behavioral problems. She learned very little in these classes and stopped going little by little. After the death of her mother she gave up on school completly and became a product of the DC foster care system.

Now, she is an upcoming college senior at Trinity Washington University. How did she do it?

To learn more about her journey from ‘Brokenness to Boldness,’ tune in to talkshoe.com or call 724-444-7444 and enter show ID #83271

DVWMT
DVWMT